Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns

Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns

A large carved granite slab located in the Evergreen Cemetery in Brooklyn, the Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns features the image of a kneeling, weeping woman and an inscription underneath dedicated to the unknown women and children who perished during the fire. The memorial was created in 1912 by Evelyn Beatrice Longman, the first woman sculptor to be elected a full member of the National Academy of Design, and is meant to evoke sorrow over the loss of so many young lives. 

The Memorial marks the graves of six women who, until recently, remained unidentified. The fire, which occurred on the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors of the Asch Building on the corner of Green St. and Washington Place, in Greenwich Village, claimed the lives of at least 146 garment workers on March 25, 1911.

A large carved granite slab located in the Evergreen Cemetery in Brooklyn, the Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns features the image of a kneeling, weeping woman and an inscription underneath dedicated to the unknown women and children who perished during the fire. The memorial was created in 1912 by Evelyn Beatrice Longman, the first woman sculptor to be elected a full member of the National Academy of Design, and is meant to evoke sorrow over the loss of so many young lives. 

The Memorial marks the graves of six women who, until recently, remained unidentified. The fire, which occurred on the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors of the Asch Building on the corner of Green St. and Washington Place, in Greenwich Village, claimed the lives of at least 146 garment workers on March 25, 1911.

Triangle Fire Memorial to the Unknowns