Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year

Title

Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year

Description

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) was a merchant, a political activist, and a remarkably versatile writer, perhaps best known for his shipwreck novel Robinson Crusoe (1719). Three years later, in 1722, he published A Journal of the Plague Year, a fictionalized account of London's Great Plague of 1665, which was the last time the plague afflicted the English capital.

Defoe’s account of this historical event was a commentary on the epidemic that ravaged the French city of Marseilles in the early 1720s. Nevertheless, he approach featured three elements that would compete for precedence within the culture of disaster over the ensuing centuries: empirical observation, engaging and emotion-laden human stories, and a belief in the importance of relieving suffering and preventing similar future tragedies.

Creator

Daniel Defoe

Source

[Daniel Defoe], A Journal of the Plague Year . . . (London, 1722)

Date

1722

Contributor

Cynthia A. Kierner

Format

Book

Type

Text

Coverage

1700-1799

Files

1722 defoe plague.jpeg

Citation

Daniel Defoe, “Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year,” Disaster History Archive, accessed October 23, 2021, http://disasterhistoryarchive.cynthiakierner.org/items/show/1.

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Geolocation