Hurricane in St. Croix, 1772

Title

Hurricane in St. Croix, 1772

Description

Proclamation of the Danish royal governor of the island of St Croix after the ruinous hurricane of 31 August-1 September 1772. Although hurricanes were common in the West Indies, this one was unusually severe. Governor Von Roepstorff estimated that the storm destroyed half of the buildings on the island, leaving many homeless. He also worried about the possibility of famine and the unruliness of the island’s large enslaved population. Von Roepstorff pledged that his government would keep order and provide free bread to the “poorest White Persons.” He also insisted “none will be dispirited with the Misfortunes they may have suffered” because storm victims could “expect every Thing from a gracious Sovereign, as no trouble shall be spared” to help the “needful.”

This proclamation was published in virtually every newspaper in British colonial America, perhaps as a tacit rebuke to the comparatively stingy London government. Hurricanes victims received no direct aid from either Parliament or the king, though George III did agree to petitioners’ request for £2,000 to rebuild Antigua’s military barracks.

Creator

Ulrich Wilhelm Von Roepstorff

Source

Pennsylvania Gazette, 7 October 1772

Date

7 October 1772

Contributor

Cynthia A. Kierner

Format

Newspaper

Type

Text

Coverage

1700-1799

Original Format

Newspaper

Files

Pa Gaz 1772 St Croix relief.pdf

Citation

Ulrich Wilhelm Von Roepstorff, “Hurricane in St. Croix, 1772,” Disaster History Archive, accessed October 23, 2021, http://disasterhistoryarchive.cynthiakierner.org/items/show/12.

Output Formats

Geolocation