Galen and the Antonine Plague

Title

Galen and the Antonine Plague

Description

Galen's Methodus Medendi is a collected body of work detailing symptoms and treatments for various ailments that Galen encountered throughout his calling as a physician and surgeon in the Roman Empire in the mid to late second century, during the Antonine Plague. Galen's description of this plague is the leading surce of evidence for many modern scholars who believe that this episode was the first outbreak of smallpox in Europe.

Galen was well respected and was often called on by state officials, at times against his will, to serve as court physician for Commodus and for Septimius Serverus.

The influence of this work led to its translation several times in Latin multiple, Arabic, English, and other languages. This image reporduces the title page of a translation (from Greek to Latin) by the noted sixteenth-century English scholar Thomas Linacre.

Creator

Claudius Galen; trans. Thomas Linacre

Source

Claudius Galen, Methodus medendi, vel de morbis curandis libri quatourdecim, trans. Thomas Lineacre (Paris, 1519)

Date

Ca. 160 to 200 AD; translated 1519

Contributor

Erin Ackerman

Format

Book

Type

Text

Coverage

pre-1450

Files

-Methodus_medendi-,_Galen,_1517_Wellcome_L0003068.jpg

Citation

Claudius Galen; trans. Thomas Linacre, “Galen and the Antonine Plague,” Disaster History Archive, accessed October 23, 2021, http://disasterhistoryarchive.cynthiakierner.org/items/show/29.

Output Formats

Geolocation